Housebreaking Your Puppy Before Your Puppy Breaks Your House

There are three major issues that new puppy owners run into and struggle with:

  1. Going to the bathroom in the house

  2. Chewing on human belongings 

  3. Mouthing and jumping

If you own a puppy or are thinking of getting a puppy you will run into the three issues listed above and lets face it your not going to keep a dog that pees and poops in your house, your also not going to keep a dog that is destroying everything in your house, and while there are people that love when puppies and dogs jump and mouth its important to note that puppies (and the adult dogs they will become) have their own personalities and there are dogs that can become dangerous if they learn to jump on you (use physical force) and/or mouth (use their teeth) in order to get you to do what they want you to do and lets face your not going to keep an out of control dangerous dog and you also might not keep an out of control hyper active jumping mouthing nice dog. 

In other words by solving the three major issues that you will face with your puppy it increase the odds that you keep your puppy DRASTICALLY.

In this book I cover:

  • Why house breaking is more than just potty training
  • Why I prefer the term house training over house breaking
  • Potty training
  • Chew toy training
  • Teaching your puppy not to jump and mouth
  • What tools are helpful for you and your puppy to quickly and efficiently get over the 3 major issues puppy owners face while having fun and strengthening your relationship along the way.   

A little snippet from the book...

We often hear people say that they are housebreaking their puppy, and while it may surprise you, I’m not a huge fan of the term “housebreaking.” I’ll explain why.

The first is that housebreaking can seem to imply that we need to break our puppy of going potty in our house. I would rather call it house training because we aren’t so much breaking the puppy of going in the house as we are training, or teaching, the puppy to go outside the house. Think of it this way: when we teach our kids how to read, we don’t call it illiteracy breaking; we call it teaching our kids to read. The second thing that I don’t like about the term housebreaking is that it only implies potty training the puppy. The reality is that in order for your puppy to be house trained, it will also be required to not destroy your house (chew toy training) and it will have to learn not to jump and mouth anytime it wants to.

There are three aspects of house training that your puppy needs to learn in order for you to be willing to keep your puppy in your house for the rest of its life. The three aspects of house training are as follows:

  1. potty training
  2. chew toy training
  3. mouthing and jumping training